Stroke Horizon Scanning Bulletin Volume 10 Issue 6

July 3, 2018
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Understanding delays in acute stroke care: a systematic review of reviews

July 3, 2018

Source: European Journal of Public Health

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Date of publication: June 2018

Publication type: Systematic Review

In a nutshell:

This review aimed to provide an overview of factors delaying acute stroke care and attempted to show how they interact in a synthetic framework.

31 reviews were analyzed that cover all factors of delays from stroke onset to treatment. A total of 27 factors were identified that had a significant impact on acute stroke care and can be categorized into four distinct categories: patient-related factors, training, resources and lack of coordination.

This review provides a wide overview of factors influencing acute stroke pathway.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library for the full text of this article. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


Insomnia is likely to be a long-term side effect of stroke

July 3, 2018

Source: Nursing Times

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Date of publication: 30th May 2018

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell:  

Stroke patients experience sustained problems with insomnia potentially reducing their ability to relearn key skills and putting them at increased risk of depression, according to researchers.


Guidelines for Stroke Survivors with Diabetes Mellitus

July 3, 2018

Source: Stroke

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Date of publication: 3rd May 2018

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell:

The purpose of this article is to describe (1) major evidence-based interventions to maintain normal glucose levels and improve outcomes in persons with diabetes mellitus after an acute stroke, and (2) the critical role nurses play in the prevention and control of hyperglycemia in persons with diabetes mellitus after a stroke.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library for the full text of this article. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


Cheap drugs that could prevent dementia after stroke to be tested in new trial

July 3, 2018

Source: Warrington Guardian

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Date of publication: 23rd May 2018

Publication type: News

In a nutshell:

A clinical trial is to find out whether cheap, readily available drugs can prevent dementia after stroke. Two charities, the British Heart Foundation and Alzheimer’s Society, are working together to test the approach. Over three years, a team led by Professor Joanna Wardlaw at the University of Edinburgh will see what effect the drugs have on around 400 stroke patients. The LACI-2 trial, to be launched during Dementia Awareness Week, focuses on lacunar stroke – a type of stroke that affects the smallest blood vessels in the brain.


Sex differences in the evaluation and treatment of acute ischaemic stroke

July 3, 2018

Source: The Lancet Neurology

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Date of publication: July 2018

Publication type: research article

In a nutshell:

Women have a higher lifetime risk of stroke; therefore, reducing potential sex differences in the acute stroke setting is crucial for the provision of equitable and fast treatment. It is essential for health-care providers to recognise possible sex differences in stroke symptoms, signs, and mimics.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library for the full text of this article. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


Experiences of stroke survivors, their families and unpaid carers in goal setting within stroke rehabilitation: a systematic review of qualitative evidence

July 3, 2018

Source: JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: June 2018

Publication type: research article

In a nutshell:

 The objective of the review was to synthesize the best available qualitative evidence regarding the experiences of stroke survivors, their families and unpaid carers, about goal setting within stroke rehabilitation. Four studies were included in this review, from which 44 findings were extracted. These were aggregated into 12 categories and four synthesized findings: (1) Person-centered goal setting is possible but often does not occur; (2) Practitioners shape the context of goal setting; (3) Practitioners need to listen to the person and know “who they are” – there is a need for an individualized approach to goal setting; (4) Recovery is ongoing and unpredictable.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS library for the full text of this article. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.